About Summit 2023

The Help Group’s Virtual Summit 2023 Advances and Best Practices in Autism, Learning Disabilities, and ADHD is a cutting edge conference that features leading experts in basic and applied research, and evidence-based best practices in assessment, intervention and treatment. Widely recognized for the scope, depth and caliber of its offerings, the Summit is designed for professionals and parents. Each year, the program provides a rich and informative experience to its attendees.

This year’s conference will take place virtually live on Friday, February 10, 2023 and will offer a selection of 15 sessions. New to this year’s format is the option to view the conference in part or in whole on-demand for up to one month after the live event. Two additional bonus lectures will be offered in the on-demand format.

We look forward to your joining us.

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About The Help Group

Founded in 1975, The Help Group is one of the largest, most innovative and comprehensive nonprofit organizations of its kind in the United States serving children, adolescents and young adults with special needs related to autism spectrum disorder, learning disabilities, ADHD, developmental delays, abuse and emotional challenges.

The Help Group’s nine specialized day schools offer pre-K through high school and transition-age programs for more than 1,000 students. Its broad range of mental health and therapy services, vocational and residential programs and affirming support for LGBTQIA+ young people extends its reach to more than 6,000 youth and their families each year. With more than 700 staff members, The Help Group’s state-of-the-art schools and programs are located on five major campuses in the Los Angeles area.

The Help Group is widely regarded for its high standards of excellence and unique scope and breadth of services. Through its commitment to public awareness and outreach programs, university partnerships, applied research, graduate and postgraduate professional training, conferences and seminars, parent education programs, publications, and public policy efforts, The Help Group touches the lives of young people with special needs and their families throughout the United States and in other parts of the world.

At the heart of our efforts is the commitment to helping young people fulfill their potential to lead positive, productive and rewarding lives.

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Summit Chairs

Barbara Firestone, PhD

Robert M. Bilder, PhD

Summit 26th Anniversary

Speakers

Jack M. Fletcher, PhD

Daniel Geschwind, MD, PhD

Shulamite Green, PhD

Antonio Hardan, MD

Stephen P. Hinshaw, PhD

Brandon S. Ito, MD, MPH

Eli Lebowitz, PhD

Pat R. Levitt, PhD

Sandra Magaña, PhD, MSW

Sally Ozonoff, PhD

John C. Piacentini, PhD

Frederick Shic, PhD

Laurie Stephens, PhD

Sharon Vaughn, PhD

Jeremy Veenstra – VanderWeele, MD

Julie A. Washington, PhD

Schedule

  • -

    Morning Convocation
    Barbara Firestone, PhD,
    Robert M. Bilder, PhD
    8:30 AM to 9:00 AM

  • 9:00am - 10:00am

    1A - Translating Autism Genetic Findings into Therapy
    Daniel H. Geschwind, MD, PhD
    Fri. 9:00am - 10:00am

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    Dr. Geschwind will present the current state of autism genetics, which has revolutionized our understanding of the origins and biological underpinnings of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Over 100 genes that contribute to ASD risk have been identified, which point to specific cell types and developmental periods of maximum risk. This provides hope for the development of targeted therapies. He will also discuss his groups work on disparities in autism diagnosis.

    Learning Objectives:
    Describe what a de novo mutation is and how it relates to ASD risk.

    Explain whether there is evidence for genes acting via common pathways in ASD.

    Describe disparities in age at diagnosis in different populations.

    Speakers:

    Daniel Geschwind, MD, PhD

  • 9:00am - 10:00am

    1B - Straight Talk about ADHD in Girls
    Stephen P. Hinshaw, PhD
    Fri. 9:00am - 10:00am

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    This presentation will cover the longstanding neglect of girls (and women) with ADHD in the scientific literature (and in clinical practice), including a "top 10" list of relevant reasons for this neglect. It also highlights the relatively recent surge of such research and clinical interest, the particular ways in which assessments can better cover female manifestations, and important data from lifespan (longitudinal) research on the long-range outcomes of girls carefully diagnosed with ADHD during childhood. Such research emphasizes the high risk such girls incur for issues like self-injury, unplanned pregnancy, underachievement in math, and vocational problems; relevant mechanisms include self-image, trauma histories, executive functions, and peer relationships. Although males and females tend to respond similarly to evidence-based treatments for ADHD, I present data on sex differences in treatment response. Above all, I feature information about how to promote strengths in females with ADHD across developmental periods. Educational goals are to foster awareness of ADHD in girls, which symptoms and impairments to emphasize in assessments, and fostering a more inclusive view of the ADHD syndrome.

    Learning Objectives:
    Identify key reasons for the long-term neglect of ADHD in girls and women.

    Describe factors that may delay or "miss" ADHD presentation in girls and women.

    Discuss key long-range impairments experienced by girls with ADHD, which may differ in key respects for such outcomes in boys.

    Speakers:

    Stephen P. Hinshaw, PhD

  • -

    1C - Text Level Reading Disabilties (SRCD): Identification, Etiology, and Treatment
    Jack M. Fletcher, PhD
    Fri. 9:00am - 10:00am

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    Text level reading disabilities are products of breakdowns in basic reading skills, including automaticity of word reading, but also occurs as disabilities involving comprehension with intact word level skills. This presentation focuses on specific reading comprehension disability (SRCD). Less common and less well understood than dyslexia, SRCD reflects parallel impairments of both listening and reading comprehension, but the reading impairments tend to be more severe. Unpacking the listening comprehension difficulties are problems with vocabulary and oral language, background knowledge, and strategic knowledge. Contemporary frameworks for understanding reading comprehension will be presented. intervention methods that address SRCD will also be included, with particular focus on teaching strategic knowledge. SRCD is often seen in children with ADHD because of their difficulties with real time processing, but may not reflect a true learning disability. In contrast, SRCD is frequently seen in children with congenital neurological disorders who are often hyperlexic. The neural and genetic correlates of SRCD will be discussed, along with the limited information on long-term development in this population. SRCD often co-occurs in children with oral language disorders and in English learners (ELs). The role of executive functions at the level of cognitive function and the brain will be addressed.

    Learning Objectives:
    Identify specific reading comprehension disabilities and distinguish them from dyslexia.

    Address effective interventions to improve comprehension in strugggling readers.

    Discuss the role of executive functions in reading comprehension.

    Speakers:

    Jack M. Fletcher, PhD

  • -

    Break - 10:00 AM - 10:10 AM

  • 10:10am - 11:10am

    2A - Telehealth Approaches to Screening and Diagnosis of Autism
    Sally Ozonoff, PhD
    Fri. 10:10am - 11:10am

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    During the COVID-19 pandemic, when medical centers restricted in-person services for many months, families encountered difficulties obtaining autism diagnostic services. Measures appropriate for tele-assessment began to be much more widely used in order to meet the needs of young children with developmental challenges. This talk will present options for remote assessment and diagnosis of young children with early signs of autism spectrum disorder. New data on accuracy of remote assessment measures will be presented. Discussion will also cover measurement of developmental functioning and provision of clinical feedback to parents via telehealth platform.

    Learning Objectives:
    Identify instruments appropriate for tele-assessment of ASD.

    Evaluate the accuracy of tele-diagnostic measures relative to traditional in-person diagnostic instruments.

    Articulate the benefits and challenges of tele-assessments for families.

    Speakers:

    Sally Ozonoff, PhD

  • 10:10am - 11:10am

    2B - ADHD, Anxiety, Tic Disorder and Depression in the Covid Era
    John C. Piacentini, PhD
    Fri. 10:10am - 11:10am

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    The COVID-19 pandemic has directly impacted 2.59 billion youth worldwide, 1.53 billion of whom were negatively impacted by prolonged school closures. Worldwide, rates of depression (25%) and anxiety (21%) in youth have doubled compared to pre-pandemic estimates. This presentation will review the clinical and functional (e.g., social, school, familial) impacts of the pandemic on children, adolescents, and families with special emphasis on youth with ADHD, anxiety, tic and depressive disorders. Strategies and resources for parents, educators, and clinicians to help children with the above disorders overcome these negative impacts will be described.

    Learning Objectives:
    Articulate the clinical and functional impacts of the COVID pandemic on youth with ADHD, anxiety, tic and depressive disorders.

    Explain effective strategies for helping impacted youth overcome these negative impacts.

    Implement these strategies to help impacted youth overcome these negative impacts.

    Speakers:

    John C. Piacentini, PhD

  • 10:10am - 11:10am

    2C - Explicit Instruction and Practice: The Secret Sauce of Teaching Students with Dyslexia
    Sharon Vaughn, PhD
    Fri. 10:10am - 11:10am

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    This presentation will provide educators with clear ideas about how to use explicit instruction to inform classroom teachers' practice as well as modify reading interventions for students with dyslexia. Unique ideas about the appropriate use of deliberate practice within instruction will be provided. This research-based presentation will be jam packed with educator friendly ideas that can be used by coaches and teachers.

    Learning Objectives:
    Define several criteria for explicit instruction and provide an example of how to improve explicit instruction in reading for students with dyslexia.

    Define deliberate practice in teaching and learning and provide an example of when and how to use deliberate practice when teaching reading to students with dyslexia.

    Speakers:

    Sharon Vaughn, PhD

  • -

    Break - 11:10 AM - 11:20 AM

  • 11:20am - 12:20pm

    3A - Novel Early Intervention in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Basic Principles and New Research
    Antonio Hardan, MD
    Fri. 11:20am - 12:20pm

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    The presentation will focus on early interventions in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It will include a brief review of behavioral, developmental, and naturalistic developmental behavioral interventions. Data from a recently completely randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy of a developmental reciprocity treatment, a developmentally-based intervention, in ASD will be presented. Additionally, evidence supporting the efficacy of pivotal response treatment (PRT), a behaviorally-based intervention, will be presented including data from meta-analytic work. The presentation will end with a summary and future directions.

    Learning Objectives:
    Differentiate between different types of early interventions.

    Define naturalistic developmental behavioral interventions.

    Describe pivotal response treatment.

    Speakers:

    Antonio Hardan, MD

  • 11:20am - 12:20pm

    3B - Parent-Based Treatment for Childhood Anxiety and Related Disorders
    Eli Lebowitz, PhD
    Fri. 11:20am - 12:20pm

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    This presentation will review research regarding the role of parents and family accommodation in childhood anxiety and related disorders and will introduce SPACE (Supportive Parenting for Anxious Childhood Emotions), an evidence-based treatment approach.

    Learning Objectives:
    Explain associations between family accommodation and child anxiety.

    Assess levels of family accommodation.

    Apply tools to reduce family accommodation and increase parental support.

    Speakers:

    Eli Lebowitz, PhD

  • 11:20am - 12:20pm

    3C - Teaching African American Children to Read: Considering Language Variation
    Julie A. Washington, PhD
    Fri. 11:20am - 12:20pm

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    This presentation examines the important role of language variation in teaching African American children to read.

    Learning Objectives:
    Identify African American English features.

    Describe the importance of integrating language variation into teaching of reading.

    Discuss the important role of translanguaging and linguistic capital in literacy instruction of African American children.

    Speakers:

    Julie A. Washington, PhD

  • -

    Lunch - 12:20 PM - 12:50 PM

  • 12:50pm - 1:50pm

    4A - Putting Down the Manual: A 30 Year Perspective on Effective Psychotherapy with Autistic Children, Teens and Young Adults
    Laurie Stephens, PhD
    Fri. 12:50pm - 1:50pm

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    Understanding the needs of the autistic psychotherapy client in terms of providing informed and affirming therapy is imperative to a productive clinical relationship. This presentation will review the current conceptualization of autism and how to apply this to the "talk therapy" room. Intervention strategies for various ages and mental health concerns, like anxiety and depression, will be shared.

    Learning Objectives:
    List the primary mental health concerns that an autistic client may present with.

    Describe at least 2 therapeutic techniques that can be easily incorporated into a clinician's practice.

    Discuss why the purpose of psychotherapy is not to make client's "less autistic" or cure them of their autism.

    Speakers:

    Laurie Stephens, PhD

  • 12:50pm - 1:50pm

    4B - Spectrum Technologies: Innovation Intersecting Everyday Application
    Frederick Shic, PhD
    Fri. 12:50pm - 1:50pm

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    This talk focuses on the evolving role that everyday technologies play in the lives of children with autism spectrum disorders. Platforms discussed include mobile applications, video games, social robots, and virtual/augmented reality. Applications include systems for measuring developmental abilities (including early screening for autism), systems with therapeutic or educational intent, and augmentative aids. We discuss how these platforms have evolved over time, why they work, and how their future intertwines with the everchanging landscape of technological innovation and invention. We discuss trends in machine learning, computer vision, and big data and discuss their potential for shaping the way we think about technology for developmental conditions and translational science. Along the way, we also discuss potential drawbacks of technology, their limitations, and discuss how our community can work together to meet current and future challenges.

    Learning Objectives:
    Describe the unique advantages and tradeoffs of technology-based tools for use with children with ASD.

    Describe multiple applications where technology-based tools can support children and families of children with ASD.

    Discuss the increasing challenges faced by scientists, parents, and autistics in the evaluation and selection of appropriate technologies for an individual.

    Speakers:

    Frederick Shic, PhD

  • 12:50pm - 1:50pm

    4C - Cultural Adaptations of a Parent Training Program for Families of children with ASD: Parents Taking Action
    Sandra Magaña, PhD, MSW
    Fri. 12:50pm - 1:50pm

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    In this talk, Dr. Magaña will discuss the need for culturally tailored interventions for parents of children diagnosed with ASD and the process of cultural adaptation. She will use examples from her own research in which a parent educational intervention was developed for Latino families of children diagnosed with ASD and later adapted for African American, Chinese American, and low-resource communities.

    Learning Objectives:
    Identify at least 3 key components important for cultural adaptation.

    Apply at least one strategy for working with diverse populations in their own practice.

    Speakers:

    Sandra Magaña, PhD, MSW

  • -

    Break - 1:50 PM - 2:00 PM

  • 2:00pm - 3:00pm

    5A - Assessment and Management of Irritability and Agitation in ASD
    Jeremy Veenstra-Vanderwheel, MD
    Fri. 2:00pm - 3:00pm

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    This presentation will share current evidence about treatment for irritability and agitation in children, adolescents, and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and outline a comprehensive approach to assessment and treatment for these symptoms. Recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses, as well as randomized controlled trials from the past three years, will be reviewed and presented. Irritability and agitation are easily observed but non-specific symptoms that can reflect multiple underlying causes. A careful assessment process will often identify co-occurring medical or psychiatric disorders. Successful treatment almost always includes approaches to improve communication and optimize behavioral contingencies. Medication treatment targeting irritability and agitation symptoms can be very helpful within this multimodal treatment context but requires careful monitoring and management of side effects. Clinical cases will be used as examples of the challenges and successes in management of severe irritability, agitation, and aggression in ASD.

    Learning Objectives:
    Discuss the evidence base for treating irritability and agitation symptoms in ASD.

    Explain the approach to evaluating potential causes or triggers for irritability and agitation symptoms.

    Consider the appropriate threshold for prescribing medications for irritability/agitation symptoms in ASD.

    Speakers:

    Jeremy Veenstra – VanderWeele, MD

  • 2:00pm - 3:00pm

    5B - Sensory Over-Responsivity in Autism: Neurobiology and Potential Treatments
    Shulamite Green, PhD
    Fri. 2:00pm - 3:00pm

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    Sensory processing challenges are extremely common in autism, with sensory over-responsivity in particular creating a barrier to quality of life and ability to participate in the community. Individuals with sensory over-responsivity have heightened responses to sensations such as scratchy clothing, loud or unexpected noises, or bright lights. Until recently, very little was known about the underlying biology of sensory over-responsivity, making it difficult to establish research-based interventions. This presentation will describe imaging research examining how the brain reactivity and regulation in response to aversive sensory stimulation in children and youth with autism, with a focus on how these studies are providing new directions and insights into possible interventions.

    Learning Objectives:
    Identify who has sensory over-responsivity and how it impairs daily life.

    Describe some of the brain mechanisms underlying sensory over-responsivity.

    Explain how current brain research on sensory over-responsivity informs treatment approaches.

    Speakers:

    Shulamite Green, PhD

  • 2:00pm - 3:00pm

    5C - Correlations, Controversies, and Community: Exploring Sexual and Gender Diversity in Neurodiverse Youth
    Brandon S. Ito, MD, MPH
    Fri. 2:00pm - 3:00pm

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    In the past several years, a growing amount of literature has been published looking at the increased incidence of co-occurring diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and gender dysphoria (GD). Given the increase in numbers of individuals presenting for mental health care, as well as the unique stressors and needs of each group, it is important for clinicians and providers to understand the current data and its limitations. The goal of this talk will be to present the updated literature on the topic as well as highlight important clinical considerations when working with neuro- and gender-diverse groups.

    Learning Objectives:
    Describe the most current literature on co-occurring diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and gender dysphoria (GD).

    Discuss gaps and limitations of the current literature on co-occurring diagnoses of ASD and GD.

    Identify at least one strength as well as one area of need among gender diverse youth diagnosed with ASD.

    Speakers:

    Brandon S. Ito, MD, MPH

  • -

    Bonus Lecture only available On-Demand - Genes, Environments, and Time: the Biology of Adversity and Resilience
    Pat R. Levitt, PhD
    Available On-Demand

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    The presentation will elaborate several key neuroscience-based concepts of early brain and child development. Five key components will be presented. First, the core ingredients of healthy child development lie in the building of healthy brain architecture, which is established through a combination of a genetic blueprint to establish fundamental organization that is advanced through a child’s experiences during critical periods of development. Second, neuroscience principles guide our understanding of how fundamental social, emotional and cognitive skills in children are established, and that these are inextricably entwined. You cannot build one without building the others. Third, there are risks that early adversity pose for later mental and physical health challenges. Science informs us the mechanisms through which these ‘get under the skin’. Fourth, the brain and the body are connected – this is not surprising, but it is a fact that early life adversity generates toxic stress responses that can impact many functional systems beyond the brain. This may be the origin of higher risk for adult-onset diseases with high adverse childhood experiences. Fifth, there are pillars of opportunities for mitigating risk and encouraging resilience, including the promotion of supportive relationships, building of executive function skills, and reducing the major sources of chronic stress.

    Learning Objectives:
    Identify the fundamental mechanisms of brain development that are involved in the wiring up of circuits related to social, emotional and cognitive functions.

    Define the key role of experience and critical periods in brain circuit maturation, and the factors that regulate timing of maturation in relation to neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Recognize the many ways in which toxic stress impacts the brain and body development.

    Speakers:

    Pat R. Levitt, PhD

  • 8:00am - 9:00am

    Bonus Lecture only available On-Demand - Stigma, Mental and Neurodevelopmental Disorders, and Famliies: A Core Frontier for Human Rights
    Stephen P. Hinshaw, PhD
    Available On-Demand

    Level of Instruction: Intermediate

    Presentation Description:
    Dr. Hinshaw begins with defining the pernicious concept of stigma and applying it to individuals and families experiencing mental and neurodevelopmental conditions. After reviewing historical issues, current evidence, and the concepts of internalized stigma and courtesy stigma, he will switch a narrative accounting of his family's (and his own) struggles with serious mental disorder, compounded by doctor-ordered silence and shame around the entire topic. The talk concludes with strategies for reducing stigma, with the hope that the struggles of the COVID-19 pandemic can be a spur for stigma reduction society-wide. Core goals are increased understanding of the core topic, realization of the linkages between stigma and low treatment utilization, and elaboration of several stigma-reduction strategies.

    Learning Objectives:
    Analyze the role of stigma in relation to disfavored "outgroups" across history.

    Contextualize how mental illness stigma is related to worse prognosis and even hopelessness for individuals and families experiencing mental and neurodevelopmental conditions.

    Synthesize personal and family narratives with empirical evidence regarding stigma.

    Speakers:

    Stephen P. Hinshaw, PhD

Frequently Asked Questions

What’s New About Summit 2023?

There are three ways to attend this year’s conference:

  1. Virtually live only on Friday, February 10, 2023. Attend up to 5 virtual live sessions with a total of 15 sessions to select from. Earn 5 CEs for 5 hours of live virtual programming.
  2. On-demand only for up to one month after the conference access and view up to 17 hours of recorded programming that includes all 15 sessions offered during the virtual live event, plus an additional two bonus lectures. On-demand will become available starting Friday, February 10, 2023 @ 5:00 pm PT with access through Wednesday, March 15, 2023 @ 12:00 pm PT. Earn up to 17 CEs for 17 hours of programming.
  3. Virtually live and on-demand. Attend 5 virtual live sessions on February 10, 2023 and access all 15 conference sessions, plus two additional bonus lectures on-demand for up to one month after the conference. On-demand will become available starting Friday, February 10, 2023 @ 5:00 pm PT with access through Wednesday, March 15, 2023 @ 12:00 pm PT. Earn up to 17 CEs for 17 hours of programming.

What’s included in Live Only?

The Help Group’s 26th annual Summit will take place virtually on Friday, February 10, 2023. Attend up to 5 virtual live sessions and select from three tracks with a total of 15 sessions. Earn 5 CEs for 5 hours of live virtual programming.

What’s included in On Demand Only?

For up to one month after the conference, access and view up to 17 hours of recorded programming that includes all 15 sessions offered during the virtual live event, plus an additional two bonus lectures. Earn up to 17 CEs for 17 hours of programming. On-demand will become available starting Friday, February 10, 2023 @ 5:00 pm PT with access through Wednesday, March 15, 2023 @ 12:00 pm PT. 

What’s included in Live + On Demand?
Attend 5 virtual live sessions on February 10, 2023 and access all 15 conference sessions, plus two additional bonus lectures on-demand for up to one month after the conference. Earn up to 17 CEs for 17 hours of programming. On-demand will become available starting Friday, February 10, 2023 @ 5:00 pm PT with access through Wednesday, March 15, 2023 @ 12:00 pm PT.

How can I access On-Demand content?
Summit On-demand content will be available to view by 5:00 pm PT on Friday, February 10, 2023. On-demand content can be viewed from The Help Group’s virtual conference platform hosted by Beacon Live.

For those who register prior to the live virtual event, you will receive an “On-demand Available” email with links to access all 17 sessions by 5:00 pm PT on Friday, February 10, 2023.

For those who register after the live virtual event, the post event, on-demand registration will open at 5:00 pm PT. You will receive an access email immediately following registration. The email will include links to access and view sessions from the Beacon Live on-demand player page at your convenience starting from February 10, 2023 at 5:00 pm PT and will be available thru Wednesday, March 15, 2023 at 12:00 pm PT.

How can I earn CE’s for viewing On Demand content?

To earn CE credit for viewing Summit on demand content:

  • Purchase On-Demand Only or Live + On-Demand when you register.
  • Watch the entire on-demand video for the session.
  • Click on the CE link that will appear on your screen when the program finishes.
  • Confirm email address where your certificate is to be sent.
  • Complete the CE Session course evaluation.
  • Pass a CE Quiz (75% or better with two attempts).
  • Download your CE Certificate once you have finished earning credit for each of the Summit 2023 Sessions. You will receive one certificate per session.
  • For additional details, please see our CE page.

What are the technical requirements?
For optimal system performance, please use the Google Chrome browser on a desktop computer. If you are unable to use Google Chrome, Firefox and Safari are also supported. Before joining please turn off any VPNs.

For help and technical support, during the live event, you can reach Beacon Live’s support line at 1-877-297-2901 or email helpdesk@beaconlive.com.

What is Summit 2023 Pricing?

Professionals

Live Only = $120 (Earn 5 CEs)

On Demand Only = $140 (Earn up to 17 CEs)

Live + On Demand = $160 (Earn up to 17 CEs)

General

Live Only = $80 (View 5 sessions)

On Demand Only = $100 (View up to 17 sessions)

Live + On Demand = $120 (View up to 17 sessions)

Students

Live Only = $55 (View 5 sessions)

On Demand Only = $65 (View up to 17 sessions)

Live + On Demand = $75 (View up to 17 sessions)

Register Now

20 Speakers
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